THE CRISIS OF THE HORIZON


small projects, tromsø (Norway)
Opening: 18th Jan 2018
Exhibition dates: 19th Jan - 31st Jan 2018


The Crisis of the Horizon is an exhibition of lens-based media art including animation, photography and expanded cinematic works, exploring the way aerial views and satellite views provoked a structural modification in the regime of vision, leading to a shift in the human behavior toward the environment.
 

ARTISTS

Agnieszka Polska

Emilija Škarnulytė

Jenny-Marie Johnsen

Simon Faithfull


For centuries, the straight line of the horizon has been an unquestionable reference for direction and orientation, as well as the main reference in the linear perspective, a foundational paradigm of representation in art history. But the line of the horizon is blind to the curvature of the Earth.

By providing an evidence that seemed incontestable and yet contradicted the most direct perception of a linear horizon, aerial views and views from outer space proved of fundamental importance in provoking a radical shift in our ways of seeing and perceiving space. With the invention of aircrafts we have become endowed with the bird’s-eye view, which also revealed to what extent the environment had been brutalized by the human activity and by the reckless expansion of mega-metropolitan areas (Le Corbusier, Aircraft); with the development of spaceflight technologies, views of the Earth from outer space became soon available, unequivocally proving the isolation of the planet, the fragility of its balance and the interconnectedness of the planet’s ecosystems (Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot). The first images of the full Earth in colours were transmitted from the Apollo 8 mission in 1968, and watched by approximately 570 million people, in an event that shook the anthropocentric perspective and raised a collective awareness toward the environmental crisis.

If aerial views showed us that any thoughtless human practice would sooner or later constitute a local environmental problem, views from outer space went one step further, providing the evidence that there is no such thing as a local environmental problem.

Without forgetting that aircrafts and spacecrafts are also leaving massive carbon footprint behind their flights, highly contributing to inject carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, the aim of this exhibition is to address the shift in our scopic regime and awareness that was produced by aerial views and views from outer space throughout history and until today.

With works by Agnieszka Polska, Emilija Škarnulytė, Jenny-Marie Johnsen and Simon Faithfull.
 

 Emilija Skarnulyte,  No Place Rising , HD video, 10’ (2016)

Emilija Skarnulyte, No Place Rising, HD video, 10’ (2016)

 Emilija Skarnulyte,  No Place Rising.  Installation view.

Emilija Skarnulyte, No Place Rising. Installation view.

 Installation view.

Installation view.

 Installation view.

Installation view.

 Simon Faithfull,  Going Nowhere 1.5.  Installation view.

Simon Faithfull, Going Nowhere 1.5. Installation view.

 Simon Faithfull,  Going Nowhere 1.5 , HD video, 9’ (2016)

Simon Faithfull, Going Nowhere 1.5, HD video, 9’ (2016)

 Agnieszka Polska,  What the Sun has Seen  HD animation, 7’ (2017)

Agnieszka Polska, What the Sun has Seen
HD animation, 7’ (2017)

 Agnieszka Polska,  What the Sun has Seen  HD animation, 7’ (2017)

Agnieszka Polska, What the Sun has Seen
HD animation, 7’ (2017)

 Installation view.

Installation view.

 Jenny-Marie Johnsen,  Total Solar Eclipse  (2017)

Jenny-Marie Johnsen, Total Solar Eclipse (2017)

 Jenny-Marie Johnsen,  Venus in Solar Transit,  2012

Jenny-Marie Johnsen, Venus in Solar Transit, 2012

 Installation view.

Installation view.

  Simon Faithfull, Escape Venicle no.6 (2004)

Simon Faithfull, Escape Venicle no.6 (2004)